Acute Coronary Syndrome

Heart attack: Gender matters in predicting outcomes

Sex (biological and physiological characteristics) differences are increasingly being studied to assess symptoms, risk factors and outcomes for various diseases. Now, a new pan-Canadian study led by a team from the Research ...

Feb 01, 2016
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PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies show promise in ACS

(HealthDay)—Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) monoclonal antibodies may represent a promising treatment option for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to a review published online March 22 in the ...

Mar 23, 2016
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Women's hearts react more sensitively to stress

While the number of men dying from a heart attack has been constantly decreasing during the past twenty years, the fatal risk particularly in young women has increased significantly. Gender medicine has already demonstrated ...

Mar 04, 2016
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Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is usually one of three diseases involving the coronary arteries: ST elevation myocardial infarction (30%), non ST elevation myocardial infarction (25%), or unstable angina (38%).

These types are named according to the appearance of the electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). There can be some variation as to which forms of MI are classified under acute coronary syndrome.

ACS should be distinguished from stable angina, which develops during exertion and resolves at rest. In contrast with stable angina, unstable angina occurs suddenly, often at rest or with minimal exertion, or at lesser degrees of exertion than the individual's previous angina ("crescendo angina"). New onset angina is also considered unstable angina, since it suggests a new problem in a coronary artery.

Though ACS is usually associated with coronary thrombosis, it can also be associated with cocaine use. Cardiac chest pain can also be precipitated by anemia, bradycardias (excessively slow heart rate) or tachycardias (excessively fast heart rate).

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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