Acute Coronary Syndrome

Cilostazol doesn't prevent periprocedural MI in ACS

(HealthDay)—For patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), adjunctive loading dose of cilostazol is not associated with prevention of periprocedural myocardial infarction ...

May 09, 2016
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Adverse events not up with six months of DAPT

(HealthDay)—For patients receiving an everolimus-eluting stent implantation, six months of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) does not increase composite events compared with 12 months of DAPT, according to a study published ...

May 19, 2016
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Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is usually one of three diseases involving the coronary arteries: ST elevation myocardial infarction (30%), non ST elevation myocardial infarction (25%), or unstable angina (38%).

These types are named according to the appearance of the electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). There can be some variation as to which forms of MI are classified under acute coronary syndrome.

ACS should be distinguished from stable angina, which develops during exertion and resolves at rest. In contrast with stable angina, unstable angina occurs suddenly, often at rest or with minimal exertion, or at lesser degrees of exertion than the individual's previous angina ("crescendo angina"). New onset angina is also considered unstable angina, since it suggests a new problem in a coronary artery.

Though ACS is usually associated with coronary thrombosis, it can also be associated with cocaine use. Cardiac chest pain can also be precipitated by anemia, bradycardias (excessively slow heart rate) or tachycardias (excessively fast heart rate).

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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