Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Study identifies leukemia tumor suppressor

A protein-coding gene called hnRNP K has been identified as a tumor suppressor for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a finding that could be important for investigating how best to target treatment of a blood cancer striking ...

Sep 24, 2015
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Staying one step ahead of cancer cells

BRD4 inhibitors are among the most promising new agents in cancer therapy that are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In a study published in Nature today, a team of researchers at the Research Institute of Molecular ...

Sep 15, 2015
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New leukemia gene stops blood cells 'growing up'

Scientists have identified a gene - FOXC1 - that, if switched on, causes more aggressive cancer in a fifth of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients, according to a Cancer Research UK study published in the journal Cancer ...

Sep 14, 2015
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Calculating leukemia progression

A new computational study published in the International Journal of Bioinformatics Research and Applications has shown how mutations that give rise to drug resistance occur in a form of cancer known as acute myeloid leukemia ...

Aug 04, 2015
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Older cancer patients heavily use health care services

(HealthDay)—Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are intense users of health care services and rarely use palliative care and hospice services, according to a study published in the August issue of Cancer.

Sep 02, 2015
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Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), also known as acute myelogenous leukemia, is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. Although AML is a relatively rare disease, accounting for approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States, its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages.

The symptoms of AML are caused by replacement of normal bone marrow with leukemic cells, which causes a drop in red blood cells, platelets, and normal white blood cells. These symptoms include fatigue, shortness of breath, easy bruising and bleeding, and increased risk of infection. Several risk factors and chromosomal abnormalities have been identified, but the specific cause is not clear. As an acute leukemia, AML progresses rapidly and is typically fatal within weeks or months if left untreated.

AML has several subtypes; treatment and prognosis varies among subtypes. Five-year survival varies from 15–70%, and relapse rate varies from 33-78%, depending on subtype. AML is treated initially with chemotherapy aimed at inducing a remission; patients may go on to receive additional chemotherapy or a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Recent research into the genetics of AML has resulted in the availability of tests that can predict which drug or drugs may work best for a particular patient, as well as how long that patient is likely to survive.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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