Alertness

New technology could improve diabetes management

A newly developed method for detecting glucose based on how it absorbs a specific type of light could spell the end of the painful, invasive finger-prick tests diabetics rely on to monitor their condition, says a Texas A&M ...

Jun 23, 2016
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What color room should you study in?

Struggling with that last minute exam-prep? Curtin researchers are here to save you, finding that brightly colored rooms can boost your concentration levels.

Jun 20, 2016
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Weight and diet may help predict sleep quality

The old adage "you are what you eat," may be better phrased as "your sleep relates to what you eat." An individual's body composition and caloric intake can influence time spent in specific sleep stages, according to results ...

Jun 10, 2016
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Alertness is the state of paying close and continuous attention, being watchful and prompt to meet danger or emergency, or being quick to perceive and act. It is related to psychology as well as to physiology. A lack of alertness is a symptom of a number of conditions, including narcolepsy, attention deficit disorder, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, Addison's disease, or sleep deprivation. The word is formed from "alert", which comes from the Italian "all'erta" (on the watch, literally, on the height; 1618)

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