Anterior Cruciate Ligament

Don't fall for the season's sports injuries

High schools, colleges and even youth sports athletes have already begun practicing and playing in the fall's most popular sports, such as football, volleyball, cheerleading and cross country. With these sports, and any physical ...

Aug 17, 2015
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New ligament discovered in the human knee

Two knee surgeons at University Hospitals Leuven have discovered a previously unknown ligament in the human knee. This ligament appears to play an important role in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears.

Nov 05, 2013
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ACL injuries in female athletes traced to genes

Female athletes endure two to eight times more anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than male athletes. Now it appears that genes are a major factor, according to Dr. William Landis, G. Stafford Whitby Chair in Polymer ...

Mar 10, 2015
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The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a cruciate ligament which is one of the four major ligaments of the human knee. In the quadruped stifle (analogous to the knee), based on its anatomical position, it is referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament.

The ACL originates from deep within the notch of the distal femur. Its proximal fibers fan out along the medial wall of the lateral femoral condyle. There are two bundles of the ACL—the anteromedial and the posterolateral, named according to where the bundles insert into the tibial plateau. The ACL attaches in front of the intercondyloid eminence of the tibia, being blended with the anterior horn of the medial meniscus. These attachments allow it to resist anterior translation and medial rotation of the tibia, in relation to the femur.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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