Bladder Cancer

Cystectomy plus chemo ups survival in bladder cancer

(HealthDay)—For patients with locally advanced bladder cancer, cystectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improved survival versus cystectomy alone, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in the Journal ...

Jan 21, 2016
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Are we ready for a blood test for cancer?

What if screening for cancer was as easy as checking your cholesterol? That's the promise of techniques currently in development that may one day make it possible to detect the earliest stages of cancer with an annual blood ...

Jan 25, 2016
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Sedentary lifestyle spells more menopause misery

Sedentary middle-aged Hispanic women in Latin America have significantly worse menopause symptoms than their active counterparts, shows a study of more than 6,000 women across Latin America, which was published online today ...

Jan 27, 2016
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Clinical trial could lead to new bladder cancer drug

A bladder cancer drug tested in a University of Hawai'i Cancer Center clinical trial is getting closer to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. The new drug, an interleukin 15 superagonist complex (ALT-803), combined ...

Nov 24, 2015
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Bladder cancer is any of several types of malignancy arising from the epithelial lining (i.e. "the urothelium") of the urinary bladder. The bladder is rarely involved by non-epithelial cancers (such as lymphoma or sarcoma) but these are not properly included in the colloquial term "bladder cancer." It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder. The bladder is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine; it is located in the pelvis. The most common type of bladder cancer recapitulates the normal histology of the urothelium and is known as transitional cell carcinoma.

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