Brain Cancer

Patients may benefit from 'cool' research

Research led by Western neurosurgeon Dr. Stephen Lownie looks to offer fellow doctors precious time when saving a life – perhaps doubling or tripling treatment time for patients who suffered an aneurysm or stroke.

Apr 29, 2016
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Mapping the routes to drug resistance in cancer

When a freeway shuts down because of an accident or construction, drivers find another road to take them where they're going. Likewise, when a targeted therapy blocks a pathway that enables tumors to grow, the cells usually ...

Apr 11, 2016
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Brain-dead woman gives birth in Poland

A brain-dead Polish woman was kept alive for 55 days so that she could give birth, a hospital official said Tuesday, adding that the premature baby showed no signs of serious complications.

Apr 19, 2016
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A brain tumor, or tumour, is an intracranial solid neoplasm, a tumor (defined as an abnormal growth of cells) within the brain or the central spinal canal.

Brain tumors include all tumors inside the cranium or in the central spinal canal. They are created by an abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, usually in the brain itself, but also in lymphatic tissue, in blood vessels, in the cranial nerves, in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary gland, or pineal gland. Within the brain itself, the involved cells may be neurons or glial cells (which include astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells, and myelin-producing Schwann cells). Brain tumors may also spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors).

Any brain tumor is inherently serious and life-threatening because of its invasive and infiltrative character in the limited space of the intracranial cavity. However, brain tumors (even malignant ones) are not invariably fatal, especially lipomas which are inherently benign. Brain tumors or intracranial neoplasms can be cancerous (malignant) or non-cancerous (benign); however, the definitions of malignant or benign neoplasms differs from those commonly used in other types of cancerous or non-cancerous neoplasms in the body. Its threat level depends on the combination of factors like the type of tumor, its location, its size and its state of development. Because the brain is well protected by the skull, the early detection of a brain tumor only occurs when diagnostic tools are directed at the intracranial cavity. Usually detection occurs in advanced stages when the presence of the tumor has caused unexplained symptoms.

Primary (true) brain tumors are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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