Brain Injury

The brain's forgotten glial cells

For a long time, researchers have neglected the 100 million glial cells found in our brains, but that is no longer the case. Now they have discovered that the glial cells cleanse the brain of waste.

Oct 10, 2014
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New test to help brain injury victims recover

A dynamic new assessment for helping victims of trauma to the brain, including those suffering from progressive conditions such as dementia, has been developed by a clinical neuropsychologist at the University ...

Oct 21, 2014
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Emotional adjustment following traumatic brain injury

Life after a traumatic brain injury resulting from a car accident, a bad fall or a neurodegenerative disease changes a person forever. But the injury doesn't solely affect the survivor – the lives of their spouse or partner ...

Oct 24, 2014
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A brain injury is any injury occurring in the brain of a living organism. Brain injuries can be classified along several dimensions. Primary and secondary brain injury are ways to classify the injury processes that occur in brain injury, while focal and diffuse brain injury are ways to classify the extent or location of injury in the brain. Specific forms of brain injury include:

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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