Cancer

Rise in head and neck cancer spurs innovations in care

Incidence of head and neck cancers - usually defined as malignancies above the collarbone but outside the brain - are on the rise, according to statistics from the American Cancer Society (ACS). The most common is thyroid ...

Aug 01, 2016
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Increasing prevalence of obesity in cancer survivors

(HealthDay)—From 1997 to 2014 the estimated rate of annual increase in obesity prevalence was higher for adults with a history of cancer, according to a study published online July 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Aug 01, 2016
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How mouth microbes may worsen colorectal cancer

Bacteria commonly found in the mouth have been recently shown to worsen colorectal cancer in animals, but it has not been clear how these microbes make their way to the gut in the first place. A study published August 10 ...

Aug 10, 2016
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Study finds marker of aggressive prostate cancer

The level of a specific molecule present in prostate tumors is an indicator of whether the cancer is aggressive and likely to spread, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Aug 03, 2016
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Study may lead to better breast cancer drugs

Biomedical scientists have revealed the inner workings of a group of proteins that help to switch critical genes on and off during blood-cell production, in a finding that could lead to the development of new and improved ...

Aug 09, 2016
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Finding skin cancer in a flash

The typical nude skin cancer checks with long photo sessions at your dermatologist's office to track any suspicious skin marks just got a lot more accurate, while reducing the chance of unnecessary biopsies.

Jul 29, 2016
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Recs developed for neoadjuvant chemo in ovarian cancer

(HealthDay)—Guidelines have been developed for neoadjuvant chemotherapy use for newly diagnosed, advanced ovarian cancer. The clinical practice guideline was published online Aug. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Aug 09, 2016
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Cancer /ˈkænsər/ ( listen), known medically as a malignant neoplasm, is a broad group of various diseases, all involving unregulated cell growth. In cancer, cells divide and grow uncontrollably, forming malignant tumors, and invade nearby parts of the body. The cancer may also spread to more distant parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. Not all tumors are cancerous. Benign tumors do not grow uncontrollably, do not invade neighboring tissues, and do not spread throughout the body.

Determining what causes cancer is complex. Many things are known to increase the risk of cancer, including tobacco use, certain infections, radiation, lack of physical activity, poor diet and obesity, and environmental pollutants. These can directly damage genes or combine with existing genetic faults within cells to cause the disease. Approximately five to ten percent of cancers are entirely hereditary.

Cancer can be detected in a number of ways, including the presence of certain signs and symptoms, screening tests, or medical imaging. Once a possible cancer is detected it is diagnosed by microscopic examination of a tissue sample. Cancer is usually treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery. The chances of surviving the disease vary greatly by the type and location of the cancer and the extent of disease at the start of treatment. While cancer can affect people of all ages, and a few types of cancer are more common in children, the risk of developing cancer generally increases with age. In 2007, cancer caused about 13% of all human deaths worldwide (7.9 million). Rates are rising as more people live to an old age and as mass lifestyle changes occur in the developing world.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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