Cardiac Surgery

Glucose levels linked to cardiac surgery outcomes

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing cardiac surgery, hyperglycemia is associated with worse outcomes for patients without diabetes, but with better outcomes for patients with insulin-treated diabetes, according to a study ...

Jan 23, 2016
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PF4/Heparin antibodies predict mortality in HIT

(HealthDay)—Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is infrequent in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but is associated with increased 30-day mortality, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American ...

Jan 11, 2016
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Probe reveals problems in Italy childbirth deaths

Italy's health ministry said Tuesday that probes into a spate of women dying in childbirth had uncovered issues in the handling of three fatal cases, but stopped short of suggesting lives might have been saved.

Jan 12, 2016
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Kidney injury common following vascular surgery

Both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease were common in patients undergoing major vascular surgical procedures and were associated with an increase in long-term cardiovascular-specific death compared with patients ...

Dec 23, 2015
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Cardiovascular surgery is surgery on the heart or great vessels performed by cardiac surgeons. Frequently, it is done to treat complications of ischemic heart disease (for example, coronary artery bypass grafting), correct congenital heart disease, or treat valvular heart disease from various causes including endocarditis, rheumatic heart disease and atherosclerosis. It also includes heart transplantation.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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