Cardiovascular Disease

Paving the way for a fructose tolerance test

Increased consumption of table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup has been linked to rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the United States and throughout the world. Both sweeteners are commonly found in processed ...

Oct 13, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (3) | comments 0

NAMS to launch free menopause mobile app

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) is set to launch a first-ever menopause mobile app designed for use by both clinicians and patients to help manage menopausal symptoms and assess risk factors.

Oct 10, 2014
popularity not rated yet | comments 0

Health gap for disadvantaged people "disturbing"

The gap in quality of health between the most advantaged and most disadvantaged Australians persists, according to new national figures released today by University of Adelaide public health researchers.

Oct 10, 2014
popularity 4 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Drinking decaf coffee maybe good for the liver

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for th ...

Oct 09, 2014
popularity not rated yet | comments 0

Dietary fat under fire

Researchers at the Institute of nutrition and functional foods (INAF) of Université Laval are calling for a review of dietary recommendations on saturated fat (SFA) in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The association ...

Oct 08, 2014
popularity 4 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Latest Spotlight News

Suicide risk falls substantially after talk therapy

Repeat suicide attempts and deaths by suicide were roughly 25 percent lower among a group of Danish people who underwent voluntary short-term psychosocial counseling after a suicide attempt, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School ...

US looking past Ebola to prepare for next outbreak

The next Ebola or the next SARS. Maybe even the next HIV. Even before the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is brought under control, U.S. public health officials are girding for the next health disaster.

Can robots help stop the Ebola outbreak?

The US military has enlisted a new germ-killing weapon in the fight against Ebola—a four-wheeled robot that can disinfect a room in minutes with pulses of ultraviolet light.