Cardiovascular Disease

Is there a guide to long life?

At age 40, Finns, Swedes, and Norwegians have reached the approximate mid-point of life. It is well known that, on average, whether an individual has more or fewer than 40 additional years to live after reaching age 40 depends ...

Oct 08, 2015
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Hearts on screen

With the patient's heart displayed on a screen, cardiac specialists and engineers can run simulations of a variety of surgical procedures and predict their effects prior to an operation. This will save lives.

Oct 08, 2015
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Study examines cancer-care outcomes among US hospitals

Decades of research have shown that cancer survival outcomes can vary widely depending on where patients receive care. But efforts to rank hospitals by long-term survival rates have been hindered by the readily available ...

Oct 08, 2015
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Menopause diminishes impact of good cholesterol

What has previously been known as good cholesterol—high density lipoprotein (HDL)—has now been shown to be not so good in protecting women against atherosclerosis while they are transitioning through menopause. That's ...

Oct 08, 2015
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Treating aortic aneurysms through virtual reality

Virtual models can be created in the angiography room thanks to an approach developed by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) and the university's departments of radiology, radiation ...

Oct 08, 2015
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Cardiovascular disease or heart disease are a class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels (arteries and veins). While the term technically refers to any disease that affects the cardiovascular system (as used in MeSH C14), it is usually used to refer to those related to atherosclerosis (arterial disease). These conditions usually have similar causes, mechanisms, and treatments.

Cardiovascular diseases remain the biggest cause of deaths worldwide, though over the last two decades, cardiovascular mortality rates have declined in many high-income countries but have increased at an astonishingly fast rate in low- and middle-income countries. The percentage of premature deaths from cardiovascular disease range from 4% in high-income countries to 42% in low-income countries. More than 17 million people died from cardiovascular diseases in 2008. Each year, heart disease kills more Americans than cancer. In recent years, cardiovascular risk in women has been increasing and has killed more women than breast cancer. (PDAY) showed vascular injury accumulates from adolescence, making primary prevention efforts necessary from childhood.

By the time that heart problems are detected, the underlying cause (atherosclerosis) is usually quite advanced, having progressed for decades. There is therefore increased emphasis on preventing atherosclerosis by modifying risk factors, such as healthy eating, exercise, and avoidance of smoking.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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