Chlamydia Trachomatis

Chlamydia knocks out the body's own cancer defence

Infections due to the sexually transmitted bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis often remain unnoticed. The pathogen is not only a common cause of female infertility; it is also suspected of increasing the risk of abdominal cancer. ...

Nov 14, 2014
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Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular human pathogen, is one of three bacterial species in the genus Chlamydia. C. trachomatis is a Gram-negative bacteria, therefore its cell wall components retain the counter-stain safranin and appear pink under a light microscope.

The inclusion bodies of Chlamydia trachomatis were first described in 1907, the Chlamydia trachomatis agent was first cultured in the yolk sacs of eggs by Feifan Tang et al in 1957.

Chlamydial infection. Advances in the diagnostic isolation of Chlamydia, including TRIC agent, from the eye, genital tract, and rectum.

C. trachomatis includes three human biovars:

Many, but not all, C. trachomatis strains have an extrachromosomal plasmid.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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