Cholera

Diseases of another kind

The drought that has the entire country in its grip is affecting more than the color of people's lawns. It may also be responsible for the proliferation of a heat-loving amoeba commonly found in warm freshwater bodies, such ...

Jul 23, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Cholera is an infection of the small intestine caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The main symptoms are profuse, watery diarrhea and vomiting. Transmission occurs primarily by drinking water or eating food that has been contaminated by the feces of an infected person (even an asymptomatic one). The severity of the diarrhea and vomiting can lead to rapid dehydration and electrolyte imbalance, and death in some cases. The primary treatment is with oral rehydration solution (ORS) to replace water and electrolytes; if this is not tolerated or does not provide quick enough treatment, intravenous fluids can also be used. Antibiotics are beneficial in those with severe disease to shorten its duration and severity. Worldwide, it affects 3–5 million people and causes 100,000–130,000 deaths a year as of 2010[update]. Cholera was one of the earliest infections to be studied by epidemiological methods.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

Discovery could lead to new cancer treatment

A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. These findings could have implications ...

Mutation disables innate immune system

A Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich team has shown that defects in the JAGN1 gene inhibit the function of a specific type of white blood cells, and account for a rare congenital immune deficiency that ...

HIV lessons from the Mississippi Baby

(Medical Xpress)—The news in July that HIV had returned in a Mississippi toddler after a two-year treatment-free remission dashed the hopes of clinicians, HIV researchers and the public at large tantalized ...