Chronic Diseases

Can we cure Huntington's disease?

I didn't cry until page 123 of Lisa Genova's terrific new novel Inside the O'Briens. That's when 44-year-old Boston police officer Joe O'Brien tells his four young adult offspring that his "weird temper"; ...

6 hours ago
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Mobilising against hypertension in South Africa

Lifestyle-related disease is on the rise in South Africa, including high blood pressure. An ingenious partnership involving Oxford University is putting the nation's extensive mobile phone network to work ...

May 27, 2015
popularity 10 comments 1

Inflammation stops the biological clock

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of Pennsylvania have uncovered an important link between our body clock and the immune system that will have relevance to the treatment of inflammatory ...

May 18, 2015
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A chronic disease is a disease or other human health condition that is persistent or long-lasting in nature. The term chronic is usually applied when the course of the disease lasts for more than three months. Common chronic diseases include asthma, cancer, diabetes and HIV/AIDS.

In medicine, the opposite of chronic is acute. A chronic course is further distinguished from a recurrent course; recurrent diseases relapse repeatedly, with periods of remission in between.

While often referred to as "non-communicable diseases", also usually lasting medical conditions, the latter are distinguished by their non-infectious cause. In contrast, some chronic diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, are caused by transmissible infections.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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