Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

The race against chronic myeloid leukemia not yet won

Although significant progress has been made in treating chronic myeloid leukemia, the disease cannot yet be eliminated in all patients, and that challenge must be addressed, states a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association ...

Jan 23, 2012
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A new approach to fighting chronic myeloid leukemia

Chronic myeloid leukemia develops when a gene mutates and causes an enzyme to become hyperactive, causing blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow to grow rapidly into abnormal cells. The enzyme, Abl-kinase, is a member ...

Nov 17, 2014
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Leukemia like Achilles, has its own weakness

Leukemia cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, especially those in the advanced stage, lack the BRCA1 protein. Importantly, the protein is not present even if the patient carries the proper, unmutated gene responsible ...

Mar 26, 2015
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Study yields new strategy against high-risk leukemia

August 29, 2013) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a protein that certain high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells need to survive and have used that knowledge to fashion a more effective ...

Aug 29, 2013
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Chronic myelogenous (or myeloid) leukemia (CML), also known as chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL), is a cancer of the white blood cells. It is a form of leukemia characterized by the increased and unregulated growth of predominantly myeloid cells in the bone marrow and the accumulation of these cells in the blood. CML is a clonal bone marrow stem cell disorder in which proliferation of mature granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and their precursors is the main finding. It is a type of myeloproliferative disease associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia chromosome. CML is now largely treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib, which have led to dramatically improved survival rates since their introduction in the last decade.

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