Chronic Pain

Publication's debut addresses pain among older adults

The first issue of a new publication series from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) called From Policy to Practice explores pain as a public health problem and takes a look at how various policies impact the care p ...

Nov 19, 2014
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ASU engineer examines brain's inner workings

Deeper understanding of the workings of the human brain will almost certainly open doors to significant medical advances. Gaining that knowledge hinges to a large degree on finding new ways to peer closer ...

Nov 07, 2014
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Smoking is a pain in the back

If you want to avoid chronic back pain, put out the cigarette. A new Northwestern Medicine® study has found that smokers are three times more likely than nonsmokers to develop chronic back pain, and dropping ...

Nov 03, 2014
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Chronic pain is pain that has lasted for a long time. In medicine, the distinction between acute and chronic pain has traditionally been determined by an arbitrary interval of time since onset; the two most commonly used markers being 3 months and 6 months since onset, though some theorists and researchers have placed the transition from acute to chronic pain at 12 months. Others apply acute to pain that lasts less than 30 days, chronic to pain of more than six months duration, and subacute to pain that lasts from one to six months. A popular alternative definition of chronic pain, involving no arbitrarily fixed durations is "pain that extends beyond the expected period of healing."

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