Colon Cancer

Mutant gut bacteria reverse colon cancer in lab models

(Medical Xpress) -- A mutant form of a meek microbe deals a gutsy blow to colon cancer, University of Florida scientists have discovered. The special bacteria halted abnormal inflammation, reduced precancerous growths and ...

Jun 13, 2012
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Team finds new route for ovarian cancer spread

Circulating tumor cells spread ovarian cancer through the bloodstream, homing in on a sheath of abdominal fatty tissue where it can grow and metastasize to other organs, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer ...

Jul 14, 2014
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Herbal tea offsets colon cancer risk

People who drink herbal tea, even as little as once a week, may have a reduced risk of distal colon cancer, according to local collaborative research.

May 12, 2014
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Killing cancer through the immune system

One of the confounding characteristics of cancer has long been that the body's usually active patrol against viruses tends to leave deadly cancer cells alone to fester, mutate and spread.

Feb 04, 2014
popularity 4.8 / 5 (4) | comments 0

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