Congestive Heart Failure

Mixed news on drinking and heart health

(HealthDay)—Texans living in "dry" counties are more likely to suffer heart attacks and congestive heart failure than people living in nearby "wet" counties, where alcohol sales are legal, a new study reports.

Jun 15, 2016
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Varying safety of add-on second-line T2DM treatments

(HealthDay)—For patients with type 2 diabetes who are taking metformin, the risk of cardiovascular events and mortality varies with the addition of different second-line therapies, according to a study published online ...

Jun 17, 2016
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Heart failure (HF) often called congestive heart failure (CHF) is generally defined as the inability of the heart to supply sufficient blood flow to meet the needs of the body. Heart failure can cause a number of symptoms including shortness of breath, leg swelling, and exercise intolerance. The condition is diagnosed with echocardiography and blood tests. Treatment commonly consists of lifestyle measures (such as smoking cessation, light exercise including breathing protocols, decreased salt intake and other dietary changes) and medications, and sometimes devices or even surgery.

Common causes of heart failure include myocardial infarction and other forms of ischemic heart disease, hypertension, valvular heart disease, and cardiomyopathy. The term "heart failure" is sometimes incorrectly used to describe other cardiac-related illnesses, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) or cardiac arrest, which can cause heart failure but are not equivalent to heart failure.

Heart failure is a common, costly, disabling, and potentially deadly condition. In developed countries, around 2% of adults suffer from heart failure, but in those over the age of 65, this increases to 6–10%.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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