Coronary Artery Disease

Results of the HYBRID trial presented

A hybrid approach to treating coronary artery disease that involves a "hybrid procedure" combining a minimally invasive bypass surgery with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was found to be feasible and safe in a clinical ...

Oct 31, 2013
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Results of the FREEDOM sub study reported

According to a recent study of diabetic patients who underwent revascularization for multi-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD), patients treated with insulin experienced more major adverse cardiovascular events after revascularization ...

Oct 31, 2013
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Results of the OPTIMIZE trial presented

A new study demonstrates that some patients may not need to receive prolonged anti-clotting therapy after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation with the Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stent, and that shortening the duration ...

Oct 31, 2013
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Results of the ADVISE II trial presented

A new study supports the use of instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR), to simplify assessment and determine the severity of coronary artery disease. ADVISE II findings were presented today at the 25th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular ...

Oct 30, 2013
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Results of the SORT-OUT VI trial presented

A new study found that both drug-eluting stents (DES) with biocompatible polymers and DES with biodegradable polymers were associated with low major adverse coronary events, demonstrating the non-inferiority of the biocompatible ...

Oct 30, 2013
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