Diabetes Mellitus

Long-acting analog insulin doesn't up AMI risk in T2DM

(HealthDay)—For patients with type 2 diabetes, the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is not significantly different for long-acting insulin analogs versus other basal insulin therapies, according to a study published ...

Aug 20, 2015
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High uric acid levels linked to greater mortality

(HealthDay)—High serum uric acid levels are associated with greater risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, but not cancer mortality, in elderly adults, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in the Journal ...

Aug 25, 2015
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Adapted diabetes prevention program deemed effective

(HealthDay)—An adapted Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention significantly improves cardiovascular disease-related risk factors among participants, according to a study published in the June issue of ...

Jul 06, 2015
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Diabetes mellitus, often simply referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because the body does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. This high blood sugar produces the classical symptoms of polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia (increased thirst) and polyphagia (increased hunger).

There are three main types of diabetes:

Other forms of diabetes mellitus include congenital diabetes, which is due to genetic defects of insulin secretion, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, steroid diabetes induced by high doses of glucocorticoids, and several forms of monogenic diabetes.

All forms of diabetes have been treatable since insulin became available in 1921, and type 2 diabetes may be controlled with medications. Both type 1 and 2 are chronic conditions that usually cannot be cured. Pancreas transplants have been tried with limited success in type 1 DM; gastric bypass surgery has been successful in many with morbid obesity and type 2 DM. Gestational diabetes usually resolves after delivery. Diabetes without proper treatments can cause many complications. Acute complications include hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or nonketotic hyperosmolar coma. Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, retinal damage. Adequate treatment of diabetes is thus important, as well as blood pressure control and lifestyle factors such as smoking cessation and maintaining a healthy body weight.

Globally as of 2010 it is estimated that there are 285 million people diabetes with type 2 making up about 90% of the cases.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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