Disordered Eating

Coping with eating disorders

Feb. 23 through March 1 is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. UConn Today discussed the symptoms, the treatment, and how to help with Elizabeth Cracco, a psychologist and director of UConn's Counseling and Mental Health ...

Feb 27, 2014
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Diet encouragement linked to disordered eating in youth

(HealthDay)—Encouragement to diet by a significant other is strongly linked to young adults' disordered eating behaviors, according to a study published in the July/August issue of the American Journal of ...

Aug 06, 2013
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Disordered eating is a classification (within DSM-IV-TR, used in the health-care field) to describe a wide range of irregular eating behaviors that do not warrant a diagnosis of a specific eating disorder such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. Affected people may be diagnosed with an eating disorder not otherwise specified. A change in eating patterns can also be caused by other mental disorders (e.g. clinical depression), or by factors that are generally considered to be unrelated to mental disorders (e.g. extreme homesickness).

Some people consider disordered-eating patterns that are not the result of a specific eating disorder to be less serious than symptoms of disorders such as anorexia nervosa. Others note that individual cases may involve serious problems with food and body image. Additionally, certain types of disordered eating can include symptoms from both classic cases of anorexia and bulimia, making disordered eating just as dangerous.

Some counselors specialize in disordered-eating patterns. The recognition that some people have eating problems that do not fit into the scope of specific eating disorders makes it possible for a larger proportion of people who have eating problems to receive help.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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