Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

Risk of esophageal cancer decreases with height

Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer and it's precursor, Barrett's esophagus, according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastr ...

Sep 25, 2014
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Central adiposity linked to risk of esophageal cancer

(HealthDay)—A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies shows that central adiposity, independent of body mass index (BMI), is associated with increased risk of esophageal inflammation, ...

Nov 21, 2013
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Statins may lower esophageal cancer risk

(HealthDay)—Statins may lower the risk of esophageal cancer, particularly in patients with Barrett's esophagus, according to a review published in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Jun 06, 2013
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TCE exposure linked to increased risk of some cancers

Trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure has possible links to increased liver cancer risk, and the relationship between TCE exposure and risks of cancers of low incidence and those with confounding by lifestyle and other factors ...

May 30, 2013
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Esophageal cancer (or oesophageal cancer) is malignancy of the esophagus. There are various subtypes, primarily squamous cell cancer (approx 90-95% of all esophageal cancer worldwide) and adenocarcinoma (approx. 50-80% of all esophageal cancer in the United States). Squamous cell cancer arises from the cells that line the upper part of the esophagus. Adenocarcinoma arises from glandular cells that are present at the junction of the esophagus and stomach.

Esophageal tumors usually lead to dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), pain and other symptoms, and are diagnosed with biopsy. Small and localized tumors are treated surgically with curative intent. Larger tumors tend not to be operable and hence are treated with palliative care; their growth can still be delayed with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or a combination of the two. In some cases chemo- and radiotherapy can render these larger tumors operable. Prognosis depends on the extent of the disease and other medical problems, but is fairly poor.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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