Fatty Liver Disease

Functional human liver cells grown in the lab

In new research appearing in the prestigious journal Nature Biotechnology, an international research team led by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem describes a new technique for growing human hepatocytes in the laboratory. ...

Nov 26, 2015
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Fitness versus fatness—which matters more?

There is a longstanding debate in the research community about the importance of fitness versus fatness in health. Are exercise and improving fitness more important than eating well and maintaining a healthy weight?

Nov 09, 2015
popularity45 comments 0

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