Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva

When injured muscles mistakenly grow bones

For hundreds of thousands of people, injuring a muscle through an accident like falling off a bike or having surgery can result in a strange and serious complication. Their muscles start growing bones.

Jul 20, 2011
popularity 3 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Researchers discover new bone deformity gene

(Medical Xpress) -- The Human Genetics team at The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute have successfully used a new gene-mapping approach for patients affected by severe skeletal abnormalities.

May 04, 2011
popularity not rated yet | comments 0

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), sometimes referred to as Stone Man Syndrome, is an extremely rare disease of the connective tissue. A mutation of the body's repair mechanism causes fibrous tissue (including muscle, tendon, and ligament) to be ossified when damaged. In many cases, injuries can cause joints to become permanently frozen in place. Surgical removal of the extra bone growths has been shown to cause the body to "repair" the affected area with more bone.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

She's not interested in sex but he thinks she is

Imagine the following scenario: a woman and a man are having a conversation. She is interested in the conversation, and is friendly, smiling and warm. He interprets her behavior as sexual interest.

Scientists find Ebola virus is mutating

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers working at Institut Pasteur in France have found that the Ebola virus is mutating "a lot" causing concern in the African countries where the virus has killed over eight thous ...

A challenge to expedite Genervon's new ASL drug

(Medical Xpress)—The Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) went viral on social media last summer. Over 1.2 million videos were posted on Facebook alone. The difficulty ...

Diet and nutrition essential for mental health

Evidence is rapidly growing showing vital relationships between both diet quality and potential nutritional deficiencies and mental health, a new international collaboration led by the University of Melbourne ...