Genetic Defects

Thyroid tumor: It takes two to tango

Autonomous adenomas are the most common benign tumors of the thyroid gland. Mutations in two genes account for around 70 percent of the cases. Scientists from the University of Würzburg (Germany) have now discovered another ...

Aug 08, 2016
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Variation in 'junk' DNA leads to trouble

All humans are 99.9 percent identical, genetically speaking. But that tiny 0.1 percent variation has big consequences, influencing the color of your eyes, the span of your hips, your risk of getting sick and in some ways ...

Aug 30, 2016
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A genetic disorder is an illness caused by abnormalities in genes or chromosomes, especially a condition that is present from before birth. Most genetic disorders are quite rare and affect one person in every several thousands or millions.

A genetic disorder may or may not be a heritable disorder. Some genetic disorders are passed down from the parents' genes, but others are always or almost always caused by new mutations or changes to the DNA. In other cases, the same disease, such as some forms of cancer, may be caused by an inherited genetic condition in some people, by new mutations in other people, and by non-genetic causes in still other people.

Some types of recessive gene disorders confer an advantage in certain environments when only one copy of the gene is present.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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