Hemorrhage

Delivering genes across the blood-brain barrier

Caltech biologists have modified a harmless virus in such a way that it can successfully enter the adult mouse brain through the bloodstream and deliver genes to cells of the nervous system. The virus could help researchers ...

Feb 01, 2016
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Blood work: Technology simulates how legs bleed

To make training for combat medics more realistic, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) have designed the first detailed computer simulation model of an injured human leg—complete with spurting ...

Feb 01, 2016
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Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences), is the loss of blood or blood escape from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body, or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, ear or anus, or through a break in the skin. Desanguination is a massive blood loss, and the complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10–15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8–10% of the donor's blood volume.

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