High Blood Pressure

New initiative aims to reduce repeat heart attacks

Every 42 seconds someone in the U.S. has a heart attack. Just after noon on March 26, 2016, Julie Kubala, become one of those statistics. She's working now to ensure she doesn't become a different one – about 21 percent ...

Aug 03, 2016
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Heat waves hit seniors hardest

(HealthDay)—As much of the Northeast struggles with a heat wave that isn't expected to ease until the middle of this week, here are some expert tips on how to spot heat stroke.

Aug 16, 2016
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Smart homes enhance seniors' safety

In Singapore, as well as many other countries, ensuring a high quality of life for an expanding elderly population demands that community eldercare providers strike a delicate balance between frequently competing factors. ...

Aug 09, 2016
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Hypertension (HTN) or high blood pressure, sometimes arterial hypertension, is a chronic medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is elevated. This requires the heart to work harder than normal to circulate blood through the blood vessels. Blood pressure involves two measurements, systolic and diastolic, which depend on whether the heart muscle is contracting (systole) or relaxed (diastole) between beats. Normal blood pressure is at or below 120/80 mmHg. High blood pressure is said to be present if it is persistently at or above 140/90 mmHg.

Hypertension is classified as either primary (essential) hypertension or secondary hypertension; about 90–95% of cases are categorized as "primary hypertension" which means high blood pressure with no obvious underlying medical cause. The remaining 5–10% of cases (secondary hypertension) are caused by other conditions that affect the kidneys, arteries, heart or endocrine system.

Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, myocardial infarction (heart attacks), heart failure, aneurysms of the arteries (e.g. aortic aneurysm), peripheral arterial disease and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Even moderate elevation of arterial blood pressure is associated with a shortened life expectancy. Dietary and lifestyle changes can improve blood pressure control and decrease the risk of associated health complications, although drug treatment is often necessary in patients for whom lifestyle changes prove ineffective or insufficient.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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