Leukaemia

Blocking STAT3 could help cancer patients in two ways

The STAT transcription factors are involved in the development of many forms of cancer. STAT3 is frequently activated in tumour cells, so drugs targeting STAT3 could be used in cancer therapy. However, STAT3 ...

Oct 10, 2014
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Journey from stem cell to blood cell revealed

Researchers have discovered previously undetected steps in the process by which stem cells become blood cells, a process called haematopoiesis.  An international collaboration, including Winthrop Professor Wendy Erber, has ...

Sep 26, 2014
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Novartis Japan admits concealing drug side effects

The Japanese unit of Swiss pharma giant Novartis has admitted it did not report more than 2,500 cases of serious side effects in patients using its leukaemia and other cancer drugs, reportedly including some fatalities.

Sep 01, 2014
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Leukemia (American English) or leukaemia (British English) (from the Greek leukos λεύκος - white, and haima αίμα - blood) is a type of cancer of the blood or bone marrow characterized by an abnormal increase of immature white blood cells called "blasts". Leukemia is a broad term covering a spectrum of diseases. In turn, it is part of the even broader group of diseases affecting the blood, bone marrow, heart, and lymphoid system, which are all known as hematological neoplasms. Leukemia can also cause multiple organ failure.

In 2000, approximately 256,000 children and adults around the world developed some form of leukemia, and 209,000 died from it.[citation needed]

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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