Leukemia

A father and daughter's race to beat leukemia

(HealthDay)—Bruce Cleland has vivid memories of the day in 1986 when he learned that his daughter Georgia, then 2, had been diagnosed with the most common form of childhood leukemia.

Nov 01, 2013
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FDA approves leukemia drug from Roche

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug from Roche to help treat patients with a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow.

Nov 01, 2013
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Battling defiant leukemia cells

Two gene alterations pair up to promote the growth of leukemia cells and their escape from anti-cancer drugs, according to a study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Oct 07, 2013
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Leukemia cells are addicted to a healthy gene

What keeps leukemia cells alive almost forever, able to continue dividing endlessly and aggressively? New research at the Weizmann Institute suggests that, in around a quarter of all leukemias, the cancer ...

Sep 30, 2013
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Researchers uncover genetic cause of childhood leukemia

For the first time, a genetic link specific to risk of childhood leukemia has been identified, according to a team of researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, University ...

Sep 08, 2013
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Study says we're over the hill at 24

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