Metabolic Syndrome

A new regulator of cholesterol levels

A high level of cholesterol in the blood is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. An LMU team has now identified an endogenous regulator of serum cholesterol – which could lead to new ...

Jan 17, 2014
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Study links nut intake with lower risks of obesity

A new study , published today in the online journal PLOS ONE, looks at the association between tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), metabolic syndro ...

Jan 08, 2014
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India's blood pressure skyrockets

Hypertension is skyrocketing in India, with rural-to-urban migrants at especially high risk. Hypertension will be a key theme at the 65th Annual Conference of the Cardiological Society of India (CSI), which takes place during ...

Dec 05, 2013
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New diagnostics for ovarian syndrome

(Medical Xpress)—Having multiple ovarian follicles is the leading cause of infertility in America, with wider implications for cancer, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndromes, hormonal imbalance and ...

Dec 05, 2013
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Latest Spotlight News

Rewiring cell metabolism slows colorectal cancer growth

Cancer is an unwanted experiment in progress. As the disease advances, tumor cells accumulate mutations, eventually arriving at ones that give them the insidious power to grow uncontrollably and spread. Distinguishing ...

Neuroscience: Why scratching makes you itch more

Turns out your mom was right: Scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research from scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that scratching causes the brain to release ...

Can parents make their kids smarter?

Reading bedtime stories, engaging in conversation and eating nightly dinners together are all positive ways in which parents interact with their children, but according to new research, none of these actions ...

Heart's own immune cells can help it heal

(Medical Xpress)—The heart holds its own pool of immune cells capable of helping it heal after injury, according to new research in mice at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Making lab-grown tissues stronger

Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments.

Fruit fly lights up brain wiring

(Medical Xpress)—Fluorescent fruit flies have helped University of Queensland researchers take a critical step toward understanding the human brain's neuronal "wiring" and how it can go awry.