Multiple Sclerosis

New blood cells fight brain inflammation

Hyperactivity of our immune system can cause a state of chronic inflammation. If chronic, the inflammation will affect our body and result in disease. In the devastating disease multiple sclerosis, hyperactivity of immune ...

Feb 16, 2014
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Modest familial risks for multiple sclerosis

Even though multiple sclerosis is largely caused by genetic factors, the risk of patients relatives developing the disease is lower than previously assumed. This is the conclusion of a new population registry-based study, ...

Jan 22, 2014
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Mapping reveals 110 multiple sclerosis risk genes

Norwegian researchers have mapped genetic variations associated with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG), bringing science one step closer to understanding these serious ...

Jan 09, 2014
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Simple eye test diagnoses multiple sclerosis

(Medical Xpress)—As you step outdoors into the bright sunshine, your pupils automatically contract. Scientists from the Australian Centre of Excellence in Vision Science (ACEVS) based at The Australian ...

Dec 05, 2013
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Could a vaccine help ward off multiple sclerosis?

A vaccine used to prevent tuberculosis in other parts of the world may help prevent multiple sclerosis (MS) in people who show the beginning signs of the disease, according to a new study published in the December 4, 2013, ...

Dec 04, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 1 | with audio podcast

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