Nerve Damage

Team finds an off switch for pain

In research published in the medical journal Brain, Saint Louis University researcher Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. and colleagues within SLU, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other academic institutions have d ...

Nov 26, 2014
popularity 4.7 / 5 (17) | comments 1

How neurons get wired

Two different versions of the same signaling protein tell a nerve cell which end is which, UA researchers have discovered. The findings could help improve therapies for spinal injuries and neurodegenerative ...

Aug 14, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (10) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Scientists discover a ‘handbrake’ for MS

(Medical Xpress) -- The progression of the debilitating disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS) could be slowed or even halted by blocking a protein that contributes to nerve damage, according to a new study.

Apr 26, 2012
popularity 4.9 / 5 (10) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Tomatoes may help ward off heart disease

(Medical Xpress) -- A University of Adelaide study has shown that tomatoes may be an effective alternative to medication in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, thus preventing cardiovascular disease.

May 18, 2011
popularity 4.8 / 5 (8) | comments 1 | with audio podcast

Research pinpoints brain's 'Gullibility' center

(HealthDay)—Whether it's an email from an unknown gentleman on another continent pleading for money or a financial scammer selling a promising penny stock, the young and old tend to be more easily duped ...

Aug 24, 2012
popularity 5 / 5 (6) | comments 8 | with audio podcast

Nerve injury is injury to nervous tissue. There is no single classification system that can describe all the many variations of nerve injury. Most systems attempt to correlate the degree of injury with symptoms, pathology and prognosis.[citation needed] In 1941, Seddon introduced a classification of nerve injuries based on three main types of nerve fiber injury and whether there is continuity of the nerve.

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