Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Cancer cells' evasive action revealed

Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have uncovered a trick used by lung cancer cells to hide from the body's immune system.

Mar 02, 2016
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Targeting cancer with engineered T cells

Dr. Philip Greenberg, head of immunology and a member of the Clinical Research Division at Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and a leader in cancer immunology, will describe how he and colleagues are genetically ...

Apr 20, 2016
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Saliva liquid biopsy

Today at the 45th Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, researcher David Wong, University of California - Los Angeles, USA, will present a study titled "Saliva Liquid Biopsy." The AADR ...

Mar 19, 2016
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Non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is any type of epithelial lung cancer other than small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). As a class, NSCLCs are relatively insensitive to chemotherapy, compared to small cell carcinoma. When possible, they are primarily treated by surgical resection with curative intent, although chemotherapy is increasingly being used both pre-operatively (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and post-operatively (adjuvant chemotherapy).

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