Peripheral Neuropathy

Potent approach shows promise for chronic pain

Non-narcotic treatments for chronic pain that work well in people, not just mice, are sorely needed. Drawing from human pain genetics, an international team led by Boston Children's Hospital demonstrates a way to break the ...

Jun 17, 2015
popularity181 comments 1

Balance compromised in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

(HealthDay)—Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) have greater maximum and range of separations of their center of mass from their center of pressure, according to a study published online March 12 in Diabetes ...

Mar 23, 2015
popularity2 comments 0

Brain tumours and peripheral neuropathy

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry are part of an international team which has for the first time identified the role of a tumour suppressor in peripheral neuropathy ...

Mar 05, 2013
popularity0 comments 0

Podiatry services manage diabetes fallout

A Fremantle-based study has revealed the incidence of foot ulceration in patients with type 2 diabetes has remained stable over the past 15 years, due to community and hospital-based improvements in foot care.

Apr 08, 2015
popularity19 comments 0

Peripheral neuropathy is the term for damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system, which may be caused either by diseases of or trauma to the nerve or the side-effects of systemic illness.

The four cardinal patterns of peripheral neuropathy are polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex and autonomic neuropathy. The most common form is (symmetrical) peripheral polyneuropathy, which mainly affects the feet and legs. The form of neuropathy may be further broken down by cause, or the size of predominant fiber involvement, i.e., large fiber or small fiber peripheral neuropathy. Frequently the cause of a neuropathy cannot be identified and it is designated idiopathic.

Neuropathy may be associated with varying combinations of weakness, autonomic changes, and sensory changes. Loss of muscle bulk or fasciculations, a particular fine twitching of muscle, may be seen. Sensory symptoms encompass loss of sensation and "positive" phenomena including pain. Symptoms depend on the type of nerves affected (motor, sensory, or autonomic) and where the nerves are located in the body. One or more types of nerves may be affected. Common symptoms associated with damage to the motor nerve are muscle weakness, cramps, and spasms. Loss of balance and coordination may also occur. Damage to the sensory nerve can produce tingling, numbness, and pain. Pain associated with this nerve is described in various ways such as the following: sensation of wearing an invisible "glove" or "sock", burning, freezing, or electric-like, extreme sensitivity to touch. The autonomic nerve damage causes problems with involuntary functions leading to symptoms such as abnormal blood pressure and heart rate, reduced ability to perspire, constipation, bladder dysfunction (e.g., incontinence), and sexual dysfunction.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

New weapon in the fight against malnutrition

UBC scientists have opened the doors to new research into malnutrition by creating an animal model that replicates the imbalance of gut bacteria associated with the difficult-to-treat disease.

Scientists identify that memories can be lost and found

A team of scientists believe they have shown that memories are more robust than we thought and have identified the process in the brain, which could help rescue lost memories or bury bad memories, and pave the way for new ...

How language gives your brain a break

Here's a quick task: Take a look at the sentences below and decide which is the most effective. (1) "John threw out the old trash sitting in the kitchen." (2) "John threw the old trash sitting in the kitchen out."