Premature Aging

The case for testing drugs on pregnant women

When the heart stops beating, minutes matter. With every minute that passes before a rhythm is restored, a patient's odds of survival plummet. Which is why Anne Lyerly was surprised when, one night 20 years ago, she got a ...

Nov 24, 2015
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Premature ejaculation isn't a true illness

A new review argues that premature ejaculation—which has become the center of a multimillion dollar business—should not be classified as a male sexual dysfunction. By pointing to false assumptions about premature ejaculation, ...

Nov 04, 2015
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Senescence or biological aging is the change in the biology of an organism as it ages after its maturity. Such changes range from those affecting its cells and their function to those affecting the whole organism. There are a number of theories as to why senescence occurs; for example, some posit it is programmed by gene expression changes, others that it is the cumulative damage caused by biological processes. Senescence is not the inevitable fate of all organisms. A variety of organisms, including some cold-blooded animals, have negligible senescence. Whether senescence as a biological process can be slowed down, halted or even reversed, is a subject of current scientific speculation and research.

The word senescence is derived from the Latin word senex, meaning old man, old age, or advanced in age.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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