Retinitis Pigmentosa

Steve Wynn: University on path to blindness cure

Las Vegas casino tycoon Steve Wynn said Friday that he gave $25 million to support blindness research at the University of Iowa after becoming convinced that its scientists were leading the way in the search ...

Oct 19, 2013
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Moving towards gene therapies for retinal atrophies

Researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) provide the first phenotypic evidence a mutated gene causes one form of progressive retinal atrophy in papillon dogs. Progressive retinal atrophy is analogous to one of the leading ...

Sep 09, 2013
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Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetic eye conditions that leads to incurable blindness. In the progression of symptoms for RP, night blindness generally precedes tunnel vision by years or even decades. Many people with RP do not become legally blind until their 40s or 50s and retain some sight all their lives. Others go completely blind from RP, in some cases as early as childhood. Progression of RP is different in each case.

RP is a type of progressive retinal dystrophy, a group of inherited disorders in which abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the retina lead to progressive visual loss. Affected individuals first experience defective dark adaptation or nyctalopia (night blindness), followed by reduction of the peripheral visual field (known as tunnel vision) and, sometimes, loss of central vision late in the course of the disease.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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