Rett Syndrome

Repairing mitochondria in neurodegenerative disease

(Medical Xpress)—The relationship between fine-scale structure and function in the brain is perhaps best explored today by the study of neurodegenerative disease. Disorders like Rett syndrome may be considered developmental in origin—and defined by exotic mechanisms in ...

Dec 11, 2013
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Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder of the grey matter of the brain that almost exclusively affects females. The clinical features include small hands and feet and a deceleration of the rate of head growth (including microcephaly in some). Repetitive hand movements, such as wringing and/or repeatedly putting hands into the mouth, are also noted. People with Rett syndrome are prone to gastrointestinal disorders and up to 80% have seizures. They typically have no verbal skills, and about 50% of individuals affected are not ambulatory. Scoliosis, growth failure, and constipation are very common and can be problematic.

The signs of this disorder are most easily confused with those of Angelman syndrome, cerebral palsy and autism.

Some argue[citation needed] that it is misclassified as an autism spectrum disorder, just as it would be to include such disorders as fragile X syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, or Down syndrome where one can see autistic features. However, it has been suggested that it be removed from the DSM-5, because it has a specific etiology.

It was first described by Austrian pediatrician Andreas Rett in 1966.

In DSM-IV-TR page 76, Rett's Disorder 299.80 is listed under the broad category of Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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