Sarcoma

Cancer treatment models get real

Researchers at Rice University and University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed a way to mimic the conditions under which cancer tumors grow in bones.

Aug 05, 2015
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Cancer researchers publish landmark "basket study"

Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have announced results from the first published basket study, a new form of clinical trial design that explores responses to drugs based on the specific mutations ...

Aug 20, 2015
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How genetic mutations promote Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have elucidated at the molecular level how an otherwise innocuous inherited mutation that is quite common in European populations interacts with a spontaneous ...

Jul 28, 2015
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The key to stopping sarcomas' spread

When sarcomas become large enough and outgrow their blood supply, they become vulnerable to hypoxia—a lack of oxygen. That adaptation not only enables them to survive the stress of low oxygen—it also enables them to withstand ...

May 12, 2015
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A sarcoma (from the Greek sarx (σάρκα) meaning "flesh") is a cancer that arises from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. Thus, malignant tumors made of cancerous bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, vascular, or hematopoietic tissues are, by definition, considered sarcomas. This is in contrast to a malignant tumor originating from epithelial cells, which are termed carcinoma. Sarcomas are quite rare - common malignancies, such as breast, colon, and lung cancer, are almost always carcinoma.

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