Sleep Disorders

Sleep drunkenness disorder may affect one in seven

A study is shining new light on a sleep disorder called "sleep drunkenness." The disorder may be as prevalent as affecting one in every seven people. The research is published in the August 26, 2014, print issue of Neurology, the me ...

Aug 25, 2014
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Natural light in office boosts health

Office workers with more light exposure at the office had longer sleep duration, better sleep quality, more physical activity and better quality of life compared to office workers with less light exposure in the workplace, ...

Aug 08, 2014
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What is whisper therapy?

Consider the stress of modern life, with its cacophonous soundtrack of traffic, electronics and construction. It's no wonder so much of our leisure time is spent in a quest to let go of the workday and unwind. ...

Jul 24, 2014
popularity 2.7 / 5 (3) | comments 0

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Heart's own immune cells can help it heal

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Toddlers copy their peers to fit in, but apes don't

From the playground to the board room, people often follow, or conform, to the behavior of those around them as a way of fitting in. New research shows that this behavioral conformity appears early in human ...