Smoking Cessation

Anxiety and depression more common among smokers

While as many as one in three smokers think lighting up can relieve stress, new research shows that smokers are actually 70 per cent more likely to say they are anxious or depressed than non-smokers.

Feb 25, 2015
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Smoking cessation (colloquially quitting smoking) is the process of discontinuing the practice of inhaling a smoked substance. This article focuses exclusively on cessation of tobacco smoking; however, the methods described may apply to cessation of smoking other substances that can be difficult to stop using due to the development of strong physical substance dependence or psychological dependence (in more common parlance, addiction).

Smoking cessation can be achieved with or without assistance from healthcare professionals or the use of medications. Methods that have been found to be effective include interventions directed at or via health care providers and health care systems; medications including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and varenicline; individual and group counselling; and Web-based or stand-alone and computer programs. Although stopping smoking can cause short-term side effects such as reversible weight gain, smoking cessation services and activities are cost-effective because of the positive health benefits.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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