Whooping Cough

Could vaccines someday improve heart health?

(HealthDay)—People routinely get vaccinations to ward off the flu or prevent infectious diseases such as measles and whooping cough. Could there be a vaccine in the future that would prevent a heart attack?

Nov 18, 2013
popularity 0 comments 1

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough ( /ˈhuːpɪŋ kɒf/ or /ˈhwuːpɪŋ kɒf/), is a highly contagious bacterial disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. In some countries, this disease is called the 100 days' cough or cough of 100 days.

Symptoms are initially mild, and then develop into severe coughing fits, which produce the namesake high-pitched "whoop" sound in infected babies and children when they inhale air after coughing. The coughing stage lasts for approximately six weeks before subsiding.

Prevention via vaccination is of primary importance as treatment is of little clinical benefit to the person infected. Antibiotics, however, do decrease the duration of infectiousness and are thus recommended. It is estimated that the disease currently affects 48.5 million people yearly, resulting in nearly 295,000 deaths.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

Finding points to a cause of chronic lung disease

Scientists have long suspected that respiratory viruses—the sort that cause common colds or bronchitis—play a critical role in the long-term development of chronic lung diseases such as asthma and chronic ...

Babies feel pain 'like adults'

The brains of babies 'light up' in a very similar way to adults when exposed to the same painful stimulus, a pioneering Oxford University brain scanning study has discovered. It suggests that babies experience ...

Technique could speed biologic drugs

Antibodies are specific molecules that can lock onto a particular cellular structure to start, stop or otherwise temper a biological process. Because they are so specific, antibodies are at the forefront ...

Cancer drug shows promise as cure for hepatitis B

Australian scientists have found a potential cure for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, with a promising new treatment proving 100 per cent successful in eliminating the infection in preclinical models.