Health Affairs

Health Affairs is a peer-reviewed healthcare journal established in 1981 by John K. Iglehart; since 2007, the editor-in-chief is Susan Dentzer. It was described by The Washington Post as "the bible of health policy". Health Affairs is indexed and/or abstracted in PubMed, MEDLINE, EBSCO databases, ProQuest, LexisNexis, Current Contents/Health Sciences and Behavioral Sciences, and SwetsWise Online Content. Narrative Matters is a personal-essay section. It was established in 1999 with Fitzhugh Mullan (George Washington University) as its original editor. Since 2006, it has been edited by Ellen Ficklen. During its 12 years of history, Narrative Matters has published over 160 policy narratives on a wide-range of topics by well-known writers including Julia Alvarez, Alexander McCall Smith, and Abraham Verghese, by distinguished medical professionals and academics, as well as by patients. In 2006, the Johns Hopkins University Press published a selection of essays from Narrative Matters: "Narrative Matters: The Power of the Personal Essay in Health Policy" (eds. Fitzhugh Mullan, Ellen Ficklen, Kyna Rubin). Since its inception, Narrative Matters has been funded by the W. K. Kellogg

Publisher
Project HOPE - The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.
Country
United States
History
1981-present
Impact factor
3.582 (2009)
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Doctor's specialty predicts feeding tube use

A new study shows that when elderly patients with advanced dementia are hospitalized, the specialties of the doctors at their bedside have a lot to do with whether the patient will end up with a gastric feeding ...

Apr 07, 2014
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Value-based insurance plans can up Rx adherence

(HealthDay)—Value-based insurance design (VBID) plans with certain features aside from solely lowering cost sharing can increase medication adherence, according to a study published in the March issue of ...

Mar 06, 2014
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Combination approach reduces spread of drug-related HIV

A computer model has created the most effective formula for reducing the spread of HIV among drug users in New York City over the next 25 years. Developed by scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health ...

Mar 04, 2014
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Predicting success of HIV interventions in NYC

New York City continues to battle an HIV epidemic, including among drug users. There are many possible interventions. Researchers have developed a sophisticated predictive computer model to help policymakers figure out which ...

Mar 04, 2014
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Experts call for prison health improvements

The very premise of prison invites members of society to think of the people there as walled-off and removed. But more than 95 percent of prisoners will return to the community, often carrying significant health burdens and ...

Mar 03, 2014
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