Journal of the American Medical Association

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is a weekly, peer-reviewed, medical journal, published by the American Medical Association. Beginning in July 2011, the editor in chief will be Howard C. Bauchner, vice chairman of pediatrics at Boston University’s School of Medicine, replacing Catherine D. DeAngelis, who has served since 2000. In 1883, the first editor was Nathan Smith Davis (1817–1904). From 1883–1960, this journal was listed with ISSN 0002-9955 and without the acronym JAMA. Furthermore, there are French and Spanish language editions of JAMA. Established in 1883 by the American Medical Association and published continuously since then, JAMA publishes original research, reviews, commentaries, editorials, essays, medical news, correspondence, and ancillary content (such as abstracts of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report). The journal covers a variety of medical topics. It includes fundamental research, research for the clinical sciences, and informs physicians of developments in other fields. Issues pertaining to medicine and health care are debated in this journal. Broader topical coverage related to medicine, includes nonclinical aspects of medicine,

Publisher
American Medical Association
Country
United States
History
1883–present
Impact factor
28.899 (2009)
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Low rate of Internet use by seniors for health purposes

In a study appearing in the August 2 issue of JAMA, David M. Levine, M.D., M.A., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, and colleagues examined trends in seniors' use of digital health technology in the U.S. from 2011-2014.

Aug 02, 2016
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Drug helps patients with diabetes lose weight

Among overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes, daily injection of the diabetes drug liraglutide with a modified insulin pen device, in addition to diet and exercise, resulted in greater weight loss over 56 weeks ...

Aug 18, 2015
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Anesthesia is safe in the young, study finds

A single exposure to general anesthesia poses no cognitive risk to healthy children under age three, a critical time in brain development, according to a multicenter study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical ...

Jun 07, 2016
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HIV vaccine research requires unprecedented path

The development of an effective vaccine to prevent HIV infections would represent a critical step toward ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Thus far, the only large clinical trial for an HIV vaccine to show promise was the RV144 ...

Jul 12, 2016
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