Neuron

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain "pruning" process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists ...

Aug 21, 2014
popularity 4.7 / 5 (33) | comments 1

Researchers debunk the IQ myth

After conducting the largest online intelligence study on record, a Western University-led research team has concluded that the notion of measuring one's intelligence quotient or IQ by a singular, standardized test is highly ...

Dec 19, 2012
popularity 4.2 / 5 (29) | comments 24 | with audio podcast

Debunking the IQ myth

(Medical Xpress)—You may be more than a single number, according to a team of Western-led researchers. Considered a standard gauge of intelligence, an intelligence quotient (IQ) score doesn't actually provide ...

May 07, 2013
popularity 3.1 / 5 (28) | comments 29 | with audio podcast

What happens when synapses run out of transmitter?

(Medical Xpress)—The recent Nobel Prize Award in Medicine highlights the importance of vesicle-based transport for different kinds of cells. One of the recipients, Thomas Sudhof, has contributed extensively to our current understanding of vesicl ...

Oct 09, 2013
popularity 4.6 / 5 (16) | comments 5 | with audio podcast report

Schizophrenia linked to abnormal brain waves

Schizophrenia patients usually suffer from a breakdown of organized thought, often accompanied by delusions or hallucinations. For the first time, MIT neuroscientists have observed the neural activity that ...

Oct 16, 2013
popularity 4.9 / 5 (15) | comments 6 | with audio podcast

Synchronized brain waves enable rapid learning

The human mind can rapidly absorb and analyze new information as it flits from thought to thought. These quickly changing brain states may be encoded by synchronization of brain waves across different brain ...

Jun 12, 2014
popularity 4.5 / 5 (16) | comments 5

Dopamine not about pleasure (anymore)

(Medical Xpress)—To John Salamone, professor of psychology and longtime researcher of the brain chemical dopamine, scientific research can be very slow-moving.

Dec 03, 2012
popularity 4.9 / 5 (14) | comments 1 | with audio podcast