Study: Seafood safe and healthy to eat

October 17, 2006

U.S. scientists say people can safely decrease their risk of heart disease by substituting seafood for other animal proteins.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration sponsored the study by the Institute of Medicine, seeking to help the public understand how to maximize important health benefits of eating seafood while minimizing exposure to environmental contaminants found in nearly every food source, including fish.

In spite of some concern about environmental contaminants, the study concluded, "Seafood is a nutrient-rich food that makes a positive contribution to a healthful diet."

The findings advise people to eat seafood regularly. However, those who eat more than two servings per week are urged to incorporate a variety of species into their diet to benefit from the variety of nutrients in different species and to avoid accumulated exposure to environmental contaminants.

NOAA said another study to be released Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association also concludes the benefits of eating seafood far outweigh perceived risks.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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