Study: Airport food improving

November 21, 2006

A new survey suggests airport food is becoming healthier -- at least at 13 of the busiest airports in the United States.

The report, by Washington's Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, shows 88 percent of restaurants surveyed offer at least one vegetarian entree that is low in fat, high in fiber and cholesterol-free. That represents a 13-percentage-point increase from 2005. Eleven of the 12 airports from last year's report improved their score.

Rated first among the airports was Orlando International Airport, which moved up from eighth place in last year's report. Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport won the honor of "most improved," with a score of 76 percent, compared with 46 percent in 2005. Las Vegas McCarran International Airport came in last place for the third consecutive year, despite making a 27-percentage-point improvement over last year.

"Travelers looking for healthy food should choose vegetarian options, which are naturally low in fat and high in fiber," said Susan Levin, a PCRM dietitian. "Even in the lowest ranking airports, it's easy to find a bean burrito or a veggie sandwich."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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