Study: 'Chick flicks' also enjoyed by men

January 31, 2007

A U.S. study suggests, common stereotypes to the contrary, "chick flicks" aren't just for women -- guys also like romantic movies.

Kansas State University psychology Professor Richard Harris said his research produced surprising results.

"Everyone thinks women like romantic movies and they drag guys along to them," he said. "What was significant was that the guys also liked the movies, and that the choice to view a romantic movie was usually made together as a couple, not just by the girl."

Although both men and women generalized men as a group wouldn't like a romantic movie, when men rated a romantic flick they had just seen, they gave it a 4.8 on a 7-point scale. When women were asked to rate how much their dates liked the movie, they gave the same 4.8 rating.

The results of the study could be something moviemakers should take into consideration when making a romantic movie, Harris said.

"There are a lot of men who go to these romantic movies and enjoy them," he said. "I wouldn't write off the male audience just because it is a romantic film. I would suggest marketing to the men in the audience."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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