Kidney recipients could be picked by age

February 9, 2007

Younger people in need of kidney transplants would get organs before older people under a controversial proposal announced in Houston.

The proposal from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network is aimed at giving transplants to people who would live the longest with their new kidneys, the Chicago Tribune reported Friday.

The proposal could still change, and the earliest it could take effect is December, the newspaper said.

Not everyone saw the proposal as fair.

"I don't have problems with trying to maximize this valuable resource, kidneys, which are in such short supply today," Jack Fassnacht, a 51-year-old Chicago lawyer with polycystic kidney disease who has had two transplants, told the Tribune. "But I don't like the idea of suggesting the life of a 30-something has more value than the life of a 50-something. That just doesn't seem fair to me."

Dr. Michael Abecassis, chief of organ transplantation at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine said the policy risks undermining public trust in the organ donation system, which could result in fewer organ donations, the report said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Landmark ruling lifts the lid on the hope, science and ethics of cryogenic preservation

Related Stories

Stem cell 'heart patch' moves closer to clinic

September 21, 2016

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional "heart patches" in a large animal ...

How a patient's 'crazy' request for a new womb made history

October 7, 2016

When the young Australian cervical cancer patient learned she had to lose her womb in order to survive, she proposed something audacious to the doctor who was treating her: She asked if she could have a womb transplant, so ...

Expert calls for animal-human embryo research to proceed

September 14, 2016

In a World View opinion column published in Nature, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher calls for animal-human embryo research to proceed – but only with strong animal protections in place. So-called ...

Recommended for you

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.