Study says obesity not tied to TV

March 24, 2007

A British researcher says television and video games are not to blame for childhood obesity.

Stuart Biddle, professor of exercise and sport psychology at Loughborough University, says the real problem may be that children are being driven to school instead of riding their bikes and walking, the London Telegraph reported.

A study of more than 1,500 12- to 16-year-olds found that teenagers who spend more time than average in front of the television are just as active as those who do not, he said. The teens watched the most television in the three hours after school.

Biddle said the teenagers who weren't not active during the three hours up to around 6:30p.m. were probably not going to be very active overall.

The 12-to-16-year-olds spent an average of about 40 minutes a day "in motorized transport," the newspaper said.

"If you look at the decline in walking and cycling among children it is far more dramatic than any changes in TV watching trends," Biddle said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Diabetes study to look at teen sleep and exposure to media

Related Stories

Diabetes study to look at teen sleep and exposure to media

October 3, 2016

Overexposure to media—television, Facebook, smartphones—may be disrupting teen sleep patterns. And according to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham who are launching a study into teen sleep and media ...

Babies and toddlers should learn from play, not screens

October 18, 2011

The temptation to rely on media screens to entertain babies and toddlers is more appealing than ever, with screens surrounding families at home, in the car, and even at the grocery store. And there is no shortage of media ...

Recommended for you

Sleep can affect male fertility

October 19, 2016

(HealthDay)—Sleeping too little or too much can affect a man's ability to impregnate his partner, new research suggests.

Does it matter how long you sit—if you are fit?

October 19, 2016

More and more studies confirm that sitting is bad for our health, increasing the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease and other lifestyle-related illnesses such as diabetes. Some studies have estimated that being ...

Are vegetarian diets heart-healthier?

October 18, 2016

(HealthDay)—Vegetarians are assumed to be healthier than carnivores, but a new study questions that assumption. It found meat eaters had no significantly greater risk of heart disease over 10 years compared to those who ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.